Archive for the ‘Olympic Swimming’ Category

Zen and the Art of Breaking World (or Personal) Records
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on July 9th, 2014

What do you suppose it takes to set a world record in swimming. More to the point, what do you suppose it feels like to swim faster than any human in history? A recent article in the New York Times Miles From Her Top Competitors, a Young Star Still Outswims Them  reported that US distance […]

Michael Phelps Redux
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on April 15th, 2014

Yesterday’s news included an item that quickened the pulses of quite a few swim fans–and probably  USA Swimming honcho’s too. Michael Phelps is returning to competitive swimming. Mind you, there was no mention of Rio 2016, only that he ‘ll race  at an Arena Grand Prix meet in Mesa Arizona next week. In the article Phelps […]

Focus = Bliss.
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on March 1st, 2013

Practicing Focal Points is as good for your brain as it is for your stroke and psyche.

Will Michael Phelps Make a Comeback?
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on August 10th, 2012

Why Michael Phelps has earned a quiet, relaxing, pressure-free life after swimming.

Will Michael Phelps Change How YOU Swim?
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on August 5th, 2012

Will the legacy of Michael Phelps change how you swim? Will you also strive to expand your mastery?

by Terry Laughlin

Posted on July 28th, 2012

In regular posts over the next 10 days, I’ll share thoughts that help make the super-human performances of the world’s best swimmers relatable to the ‘average’ swimmers–including those who may be inspired this week to begin a swimming journey. Many of these posts will focus more on how Olympians think, than how they stroke. This can often be of far greater value.

While the mainstream media will handicap the races — breathlessly speculating whether Lochte or Phelps will win the 400 IM– or look for human interest stories, I’m less interested in outcomes or personalities, than in what we can learn from Olympic swimmers that can positively impact our own swimming. And we can often draw more valuable insights from how Olympic swimmers think than how they stroke.