Archive for the ‘Balance’ Category

T.I. (‘Tee-Aye’) Chi
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on February 7th, 2014

Brian Suddeth, a TI enthusiast from Bowie MD. has been helping a blind friend and co-worker, named Mark, to learn efficiency the TI way. Mark had attempted a marathon run, but suffered an injury and had to drop out.  So his new goal is to complete a mile in open water, at the Great Chesapeake […]

Allen Rosenberg Transformed Olympic Rowing: What can his methods do for your swimming?
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on December 15th, 2013

This week, TI Coach Bill Lang sent me a link to a NY Times obituary for Allen Rosenberg,the US national coach for rowing in the 1960s and 1970s, a period of transformation in rowing form and philosophy. Bill shared this with me because he saw such strong parallels between Rosenberg’s principles and those of TI. […]

Permission to Swim Slowly
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on December 14th, 2012

Swimming more slowly is one of the least appreciated ways to swim better. And faster.

by Terry Laughlin

Posted on July 28th, 2012

In regular posts over the next 10 days, I’ll share thoughts that help make the super-human performances of the world’s best swimmers relatable to the ‘average’ swimmers–including those who may be inspired this week to begin a swimming journey. Many of these posts will focus more on how Olympians think, than how they stroke. This can often be of far greater value.

While the mainstream media will handicap the races — breathlessly speculating whether Lochte or Phelps will win the 400 IM– or look for human interest stories, I’m less interested in outcomes or personalities, than in what we can learn from Olympic swimmers that can positively impact our own swimming. And we can often draw more valuable insights from how Olympic swimmers think than how they stroke.

Two Key Lessons for New TI (Adult) Swimmers
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on December 20th, 2011

Two Lessons for new adult swimmers: (1) Be in This Place and Moment as comfortably and calmly as possible, rather than straining to reach the other end. (2) Don’t self-criticize or judge. Instead learn from every experience.

First TI Swim Lesson: “Weightless in the Water”
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on December 18th, 2011

Let go of the usual goal of Getting to the Other End of the pool. Your new goal is to Be Aware of Every Stroke.

Secrets of Swim Speed Part 9: How to Swim Faster
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on May 2nd, 2011

How Nicholas Sterghos had the most-dramatic 2-year swimming improvement in triathlon history – while his West Point Tri team rose from 14th and 19th (men and women) to 2nd and 5th in College Triathlon Championships.

Video: Secrets of Swimming Faster Part 8 of 9 – Conscious Practice
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on April 30th, 2011

Swimming efficiently in a race setting must begin with conscious, intentional practice organized around learning Balance and Streamline skills that don’t come naturally.

Stroke Length Practice: First Improve. Then Maintain.
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on April 22nd, 2011

Nearly every choice you make about planning practices and sets should be driven primarily by whether your repeats strengthen your ability to stay efficient at a range of distances, tempos or paces.

60th Birthday Practice
by Terry Laughlin

Posted on March 26th, 2011

A special practice for my 60th birthday in which every set presents an interesting problem that (i) takes keen attention to solve; (ii) is objectively measurable; and (iii) develops Skills That Win Races.*